Sahara Dust Cloud has reached the US mainland

Sahara Dust Cloud
The dry and dusty air known as the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) forms in the Sahara Desert and travels across the North Atlantic every three to five days

The densest plume of dust travelling from the Sahara desert has reached the US mainland.

The massive plume of dust and sand is one of the most significant Sahara dust events in decades, according to forecasters.

It has been travelling from western Africa and has now moved into the Gulf of MExico and the South. Also Read– Saharan Dust Storm moving towards Texas

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the dry and dusty air known as the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) forms in the Sahara Desert and travels across the North Atlantic every three to five days. It starts from late spring to early fall and peaks in June to mid-August.

The dust cloud can occupy as much as a 2-mile thick layer in the atmosphere.

READ MORE: Historic Saharan dust plume to stretch into the US

“The main impacts of the Saharan dust are a whitening of the sky during daylight hours, redder sunsets, and decreased air quality,” the National Weather Service said.

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